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1 : An annual church festival commemorating Christ's resurrection, and occurring on Sunday, the second day after Good Friday. It corresponds to the pasha or passover of the Jews, and most nations still give it this name under the various forms of pascha, pasque, paque, or pask.

2 : The day on which the festival is observed; Easter day.

3 : To veer to the east; -- said of the wind.

4 : A native of a country eastward of another; -- used, by the English, of traders or others from the coasts of the Baltic.

5 : A piece of money coined in the east by Richard II. of England.

6 : The smew.

7 : Relating to the money of the Easterlings, or Baltic traders. See Sterling.

8 : Coming from the east; as, it was easterly wind.

9 : Situated, directed, or moving toward the east; as, the easterly side of a lake; an easterly course or voyage.

10 : Toward, or in the direction of, the east.

11 : Situated or dwelling in the east; oriental; as, an eastern gate; Eastern countries.

12 : Going toward the east, or in the direction of east; as, an eastern voyage.

13 : Most eastern.

14 : One who fares deliciously.

15 : One who entertains magnificently.

16 : A storm, strong wind, or gale, coming from the northeast.

17 : Pertaining to the northeast; toward the northeast, or coming from the northeast.

18 : Toward the northeast.

19 : Of or pertaining to the northeast; northeasterly.

20 : The wild olive tree (Olea Europea, var. sylvestris).

21 : Any species of the genus Elaeagus. See Eleagnus. The small silvery berries of the common species (Elaeagnus hortensis) are called Trebizond dates, and are made into cakes by the Arabs.

22 : See Pinaster.

23 : A storm, strong wind, or gale coming from the southeast.

24 : Toward the southeast.

25 : Of or pertaining to the southeast; southeasterly.

(25) words is found which contain easter in our database

For easter word found data is following....

1 : Easter

n.

An annual church festival commemorating Christ's resurrection, and occurring on Sunday, the second day after Good Friday. It corresponds to the pasha or passover of the Jews, and most nations still give it this name under the various forms of pascha, pasque, paque, or pask.

2 : Easter

n.

The day on which the festival is observed; Easter day.

3 : Easter

v. i.

To veer to the east; -- said of the wind.

4 : Easterling

n.

A native of a country eastward of another; -- used, by the English, of traders or others from the coasts of the Baltic.

5 : Easterling

n.

A piece of money coined in the east by Richard II. of England.

6 : Easterling

n.

The smew.

7 : Easterling

a.

Relating to the money of the Easterlings, or Baltic traders. See Sterling.

8 : Easterly

a.

Coming from the east; as, it was easterly wind.

9 : Easterly

a.

Situated, directed, or moving toward the east; as, the easterly side of a lake; an easterly course or voyage.

10 : Easterly

adv.

Toward, or in the direction of, the east.

11 : Eastern

a.

Situated or dwelling in the east; oriental; as, an eastern gate; Eastern countries.

12 : Eastern

a.

Going toward the east, or in the direction of east; as, an eastern voyage.

13 : Easternmost

a.

Most eastern.

14 : Feaster

n.

One who fares deliciously.

15 : Feaster

n.

One who entertains magnificently.

16 : Northeaster

n.

A storm, strong wind, or gale, coming from the northeast.

17 : Northeasterly

a.

Pertaining to the northeast; toward the northeast, or coming from the northeast.

18 : Northeasterly

adv.

Toward the northeast.

19 : Northeastern

a.

Of or pertaining to the northeast; northeasterly.

20 : Oleaster

n.

The wild olive tree (Olea Europea, var. sylvestris).

21 : Oleaster

n.

Any species of the genus Elaeagus. See Eleagnus. The small silvery berries of the common species (Elaeagnus hortensis) are called Trebizond dates, and are made into cakes by the Arabs.

22 : Pineaster

n.

See Pinaster.

23 : Southeaster

n.

A storm, strong wind, or gale coming from the southeast.

24 : Southeaster

adv.

Toward the southeast.

25 : Southeastern

a.

Of or pertaining to the southeast; southeasterly.

This word easter uses (6) total characters with white space

This word easter uses (6) total characters with white out space

This word easter uses 5 unique characters: A E R S T

Number of all permutations npr for easter word is (120)

Number of all combination ncr for easter word is (120)

Similar matching soundex word for easter

2 same character containing word for easter

3 same character containing word For easter

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From Wikipedia

Easter
Resurrection (24).jpg
Icon of the Resurrection, with Christ having kicked down the gates of Hades and pulling Adam and Eve out of the tombs. Christ is flanked by saints, and Satan—depicted as an old man—is bound and chained. (See Resurrection of Jesus in Christian art.)
TypeChristian, cultural
SignificanceCelebrates the resurrection of Jesus
CelebrationsChurch services, festive family meals, Easter egg decoration, and gift-giving
ObservancesPrayer, all-night vigil, sunrise service
Datevariable, variable
2016 date27 March (Western)
1 May (Eastern)
2017 date16 April (Western)
16 April (Eastern)
2018 date1 April (Western)
8 April (Eastern)
Related toPassover, of which it is regarded the Christian fulfillment; Septuagesima, Sexagesima, Quinquagesima, Shrove Tuesday, Ash Wednesday, Clean Monday, Lent, Great Lent, Palm Sunday, Holy Week, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday which lead up to Easter; and Thomas Sunday, Ascension, Pentecost, Trinity Sunday, and Corpus Christi which follow it.

Easter,[nb 1] also called Pascha (Greek, Latin)[nb 2] or Resurrection Sunday,[3][4] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary c. 30 AD.[5][6] It is the culmination of the Passion of Jesus, preceded by Lent (or Great Lent), a forty-day period of fasting, prayer, and penance.

Most Christians refer to the week before Easter as "Holy Week"—it contains the days of the Easter Triduum, including Maundy Thursday, commemorating the Maundy and Last Supper,[7][8] as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus.[9] In Western Christianity, Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and lasts seven weeks, ending with the coming of the fiftieth day, Pentecost Sunday. In Eastern Christianity, the season of Pascha begins on Pascha and ends with the coming of the fortieth day, the Feast of the Ascension.

Easter and the holidays that are related to it are moveable feasts which do not fall on a fixed date in the Gregorian or Julian calendars which follow only the cycle of the sun; rather, its date is determined on a lunisolar calendar similar to the Hebrew calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established two rules, independence of the Jewish calendar and worldwide uniformity, which were the only rules for Easter explicitly laid down by the council. No details for the computation were specified; these were worked out in practice, a process that took centuries and generated a number of controversies. It has come to be the first Sunday after the ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or soonest after 21 March,[10] but calculations vary.

Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In most European languages the feast called Easter in English is termed by the words for passover in those languages and in the older English versions of the Bible the term Easter was the term used to translate passover.[11] Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, exclaiming the Paschal greeting, clipping the church,[12] and decorating Easter eggs (symbols of the empty tomb).[13][14][15] The Easter lily, a symbol of the resurrection,[16][17] traditionally decorates the chancel area of churches on this day and for the rest of Eastertide.[18] Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include egg hunting, the Easter Bunny, and Easter parades.[19][20][21] There are also various traditional Easter foods that vary regionally.
Cite error: There are <ref group=nb> tags on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist|group=nb}} template (see the help page).

  1. ^ Ferguson, Everett (2009). Baptism in the Early Church: History, Theology, and Liturgy in the First Five Centuries. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. p. 351. ISBN 9780802827487. Retrieved 23 April 2014. The practices are usually interpreted in terms of baptism at the pasch (Easter), for which compare Tertullian, but the text does not specify this season, only that it was done on Sunday, and the instructions may apply to whenever the baptism was to be performed. 
  2. ^ Norman Davies (20 January 1998). Europe: A History. HarperCollins. ISBN 9780060974688. In most European languages Easter is called by some variant of the late Latin word Pascha, which in turn derives from the Hebrew pesach, passover. 
  3. ^ Gamman, Andrew; Bindon, Caroline (11 February 2014). Stations for Lent and Easter. Kereru Publishing Limited. p. 7. ISBN 9780473276812. Easter Day, also known as Resurrection Sunday, marks the high point of the Christian year. It is the day that we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. 
  4. ^ Boda, Mark J.; Smith, Gordon T. (2006). Repentance in Christian Theology. Liturgical Press. p. 316. ISBN 9780814651759. Retrieved 19 April 2014. It should be noted that Orthodox, Catholic, and all Reformed churches in the Middle East celebrate Easter according to the Eastern calendar, calling this holy day "Resurrection Sunday," not Easter. 
  5. ^ Bernard Trawicky, Ruth Wilhelme Gregory (2000). Anniversaries and Holidays. American Library Association. ISBN 9780838906958. Easter is the central celebration of the Christian liturgical year. It is the oldest and most important Christian feast, celebrating the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. The date of Easter determines the dates of all movable feasts except those of Advent. 
  6. ^ Aveni, Anthony (2004). "The Easter/Passover Season: Connecting Time's Broken Circle", The Book of the Year: A Brief History of Our Seasonal Holidays. Oxford University Press. pp. 64–78. ISBN 0-19-517154-3. 
  7. ^ Peter C. Bower (1 January 2003). The Companion to the Book of Common Worship. Geneva Press. ISBN 9780664502324. Retrieved 11 April 2009. Maundy Thursday (or le mandé; Thursday of the Mandatum, Latin, commandment). The name is taken from the first few words sung at the ceremony of the washing of the feet, "I give you a new commandment" (John 13:34); also from the commandment of Christ that we should imitate His loving humility in the washing of the feet (John 13:14–17). The term mandatum (maundy), therefore, was applied to the rite of foot-washing on this day. 
  8. ^ Gail Ramshaw (2004). Three Day Feast: Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Easter. Augsburg Books. ISBN 9781451408164. Retrieved 11 April 2009. In the liturgies of the Three Days, the service for Maundy Thursday includes both, telling the story of Jesus' last supper and enacting the footwashing. 
  9. ^ Leonard Stuart (1909). New century reference library of the world's most important knowledge: complete, thorough, practical, Volume 3. Syndicate Pub. Co. Retrieved 11 April 2009. Holy Week, or Passion Week, the week which immediately precedes Easter, and is devoted especially to commemorating the passion of our Lord. The Days more especially solemnized during it are Holy Wednesday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday. 
  10. ^ "Frequently asked questions about the date of Easter". 
  11. ^ Weiser, Francis X. (1958). Handbook of Christian Feasts and Customs. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company. p. 214. ISBN 0-15-138435-5. 
  12. ^ "clipping the church". Oxford Reference. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/acref/9780198607663.001.0001. Retrieved 30 March 2013. 
  13. ^ Anne Jordan (5 April 2000). Christianity. Nelson Thornes. ISBN 9780748753208. Retrieved 7 April 2012. Easter eggs are used as a Christian symbol to represent the empty tomb. The outside of the egg looks dead but inside there is new life, which is going to break out. The Easter egg is a reminder that Jesus will rise from His tomb and bring new life. Eastern Orthodox Christians dye boiled eggs red to represent the blood of Christ shed for the sins of the world. 
  14. ^ The Guardian, Volume 29. H. Harbaugh. 1878. Retrieved 7 April 2012. Just so, on that first Easter morning, Jesus came to life and walked out of the tomb, and left it, as it were, an empty shell. Just so, too, when the Christian dies, the body is left in the grave, an empty shell, but the soul takes wings and flies away to be with God. Thus you see that though an egg seems to be as dead as a sone, yet it really has life in it; and also it is like Christ's dead body, which was raised to life again. This is the reason we use eggs on Easter. (In olden times they used to color the eggs red, so as to show the kind of death by which Christ died,-a bloody death.) 
  15. ^ Gordon Geddes, Jane Griffiths (22 January 2002). Christian belief and practice. Heinemann. ISBN 9780435306915. Retrieved 7 April 2012. Red eggs are given to Orthodox Christians after the Easter Liturgy. They crack their eggs against each other's. The cracking of the eggs symbolizes a wish to break away from the bonds of sin and misery and enter the new life issuing from Christ's resurrection. 
  16. ^ Collins, Cynthia (19 April 2014). "Easter Lily Tradition and History". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 April 2014. The Easter Lily is symbolic of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Churches of all denominations, large and small, are filled with floral arrangements of these white flowers with their trumpet-like shape on Easter morning. 
  17. ^ Schell, Stanley (1916). Easter Celebrations. Werner & Company. p. 84. We associate the lily with Easter, as pre-eminently the symbol of the Resurrection. 
  18. ^ Luther League Review: 1936–1937. Luther League of America. 1936. 
  19. ^ Vicki K. Black (1 July 2004). The Church Standard, Volume 74. Church Publishing, Inc. ISBN 9780819225757. Retrieved 7 April 2012. In parts of Europe, the eggs were dyed red and were then cracked together when people exchanged Easter greetings. Many congregations today continue to have Easter egg hunts for the children after the services on Easter Day. 
  20. ^ The Church Standard, Volume 74. Walter N. Hering. 1897. Retrieved 7 April 2012. When the custom was carrierd over into Christian practice the Easter eggs were usually sent to the priests to be blessed and sprinked with holy water. In later times the coloring and decorating of eggs was introduced, and in a royal roll of the time of Edward I., which is preserved in the Tower of London, there is an entry of 18d. for 400 eggs, to be used for Easter gifts. 
  21. ^ Brown, Eleanor Cooper (2010). From Preparation to Passion. ISBN 9781609577650. Retrieved 7 April 2012. So what preparations do most Christians and non-Christians make? Shopping for new clothing often signifies the belief that Spring has arrived, and it is a time of renewal. Preparations for the Easter Egg Hunts and the Easter Ham for the Sunday dinner are high on the list too. 

From Wiktionary

See also: Easter

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Adjective
    • 1.4 Anagrams

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English eastera, eastra. Compare norther, souther, wester.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈiː.stə/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

easter (comparative more easter, superlative most easter)

  1. (now regional) Eastern. [from 8th c.]
    • 1824, James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Oxford 2010, p. 57:
      In the mean while, as our apartment was a corner one, and looked both east and north, I ran to the easter casement to look after Drummond.

Anagrams[edit]

  • Teresa, aretes, arsete, arêtes, asteer, earset, eaters, ratees, reseat, saeter, seater, staree, teares, teaser